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Ray Rice Should Be

Knocked Out, Too

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Ray Rice signs autographs for fans at a Wendy's restaurant in 2009
Now That The Video Of Former Baltimore Ravens Running Back Ray Rice Punching And Knocking Out His Wife, He Should Be Banned From The Game To Send A Message That Such Actions Are Unacceptable In Modern Society

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By Wayne Schutsky
Modern Times Magazine

Sept. 10, 2014 — Well, the Ravens finally did what the team should’ve done all along — it released Ray Rice on Monday. The NFL also got in on the act and changed Rice’s league-wide suspension from two-games to indefinite.

While it’s good that the team and league finally decided to take stronger action against Rice — who was caught on camera dragging his then-fiancee Janay Palmer’s unconscious body out of an elevator — the whole episode is rife with confounding questions about what the NFL knew and when it knew it.

Regardless, now Rice needs to get knocked out from professional football in order to send a message that no one — and especially not athletes who get millions to play a game — should resort to physical force when disagreements arise.

First, a recap.

Rice was charged with third-degree aggravated assault for knocking his fiancee out during an altercation in February. The NFL then responded with a resounding two-game suspension: that’s less than several players are serving this year for testing positive for pot.

The Ravens, meanwhile, stuck their heads in the sand and chose to let the NFL dole out punishment.

To make matters worse, during a Ravens press conference on the incident, Rice and Palmer each spoke and Palmer took partial blame for the incident. No human being deserves to be victimized the way she was, especially by her fiancee. This was domestic abuse plain and simple. The fact that the Ravens hosted the charade of a press conference in the first place only goes to show how out of touch with reality the organization has been since jump street.

The only conceivable justification the NFL could have had for the lackluster suspension earlier this summer was its contention that it didn’t have access to the full videotape of the incident.

Update: A law enforcement source told The Associated Press that the NFL has had access to the full video since April. The source played a voicemail coming from a number at NFL offices with a woman’s voice confirming that the league received the video.

That all changed when TMZ released a full video recording of the assault this Monday, which clearly shows Rice take the disagreement to a physical level that has no place in a human relationship by shoving his fiancee as they enter the elevator. He then punches her in the face when she tries to retaliate. The blow knocks her unconscious. When the elevator door opens, Rice tries to drag her body out. He then leaves her lying halfway in the elevator as the door attempts to close on her multiple times.


At one point, another man who has on an ‘official’ looking jacket and might be a hotel employee, approaches Rice who then attempts to revive Palmer as if she had passed out on her own.

Once the full video came out to the public, the Ravens and the NFL were quick to cut ties with Rice. But, it never should’ve taken this long.

First off, I find it hard to believe that the NFL didn’t have access to the this tape earlier. It’s one of the most powerful organizations in the U.S. Whether you are a fan or not, it has a fiscal and societal impact that gives it unique reach in these situations.

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