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Prime Cuts 2012

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The Top Seven Most Read Articles Include An Analysis Of ALEC, An Examination Of Climate Change, A Squinting Look Up At The Eyes In The Sky, And More

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By Staff Report
Modern Times Magazine

Dec. 30, 2012 — The past year was in many respects just like the others that had followed — unpredictable, yet strangely predictable.

People were killed, policies were changed, but sometimes, it seems like the more things change, the more they stay the same. Those with power continue to make sure they keep it, the word keeps getting hotter, and there still is not a viable political  third-party in the United States.

On the pages of Modern Times Magazine, we reported on many of these tales and we happily present the most read Nation/World articles of 2012.


No. 7 — “A Wounded ALEC Assembles In Utah”


In July, as the American Legislative Exchange Council prepared to meet in Utah, the group was reeling. More than 20 corporations had pulled their support and more than 50 state legislators from around the country had also vacated their public support.

While The Center for Media Democracy, ColorofChange.org and many other groups and organizations deserved a lot of the credit for chipping away at ALEC’s public veneer, the people that took to the streets deserve a big chick of he credit as well. Especially those protesters that withstood tear gas and arrest in Scottsdale.
Read full article —>


No. 6 — “Climate Change: A Ball of Confusion”


Climate change is regularly part of the national discourse, but in early February, a back and forth occurred that made most everyone shake their heads in disbelief. At the center of the fury was the venerable Wall Street Journal, which published an article so steeped in climate change skepticism that they were forced to quickly run an article from 40 scientists rebutting the claims.

The godfather of climate change warnings, Dr. James Hansen, who heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, also released a statement to rebut the skeptics, and he pulled no punches.

“The fossil fuel kingpins who profit from the public’s fossil fuel addiction, some of them multi-billionaires, are loosely knit, but with a well-understood common objective of maintaining the public's addiction. These kingpins have the resources to be well aware of the scientific knowledge concerning the consequences of continued exploitation of fossil fuels. However, they choose not only to ignore those facts, but to support activities intended to keep the public ill-informed. These kingpins are guilty of high crimes against humanity and nature,” Hansen wrote.
Read full article —>


No. 5 — “Living Lessons From Heywood Suicides”


In January, the Phoenix area was stunned to learn that Valley legend Bill Heywood and his wife, Susan, had committed suicide. In the wake of the tragedy, Modern Times Magazine received a submission from Laura Larson-Huffaker, executive director of La Frontera/EMPACT-Suicide Prevention Center, that provided tips and suggestions for those contemplating ending their lives and the friends and loved ones of some they may think might be contemplating such as act.
Read full article —>


No. 4 — “The Sorry State of Gov. Brewer”


In a story that captured worldwide media attention for weeks and is still embedded in the national psyche, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer met President Barack Obama as he exited Air Force One and wagged her finger at him.

It was not just a black eye for the state of Arizona, but for the entire nation: the moment an embarrassing governor with the IQ of the scorpions she allegedly eats for breakfast showed just how idiotic and dogmatic she is.

“Gov. Jan ‘Brew-ha-ha’ Brewer, Arizona’s illustrious governor, embarrassed everyone who lives, has lived, ever lived, or knew anybody who might have any connection to the Grand Canyon state,” wrote Modern Times Editor John Guzzon.
Read full article —>


No. 3 — “FAA Drone Rules: A Privacy Enigma”


In February, the Federal Aviation Administration was ordered by Congress via the FAA Reauthorization Act to integrate drone aircraft into the nation’s airspace — the first step in a reworking of aviation rules that would redefine the industry.

“The resulting future could be a place where small, lightweight craft are used for things such as inspecting roofs and chasing down bank robbers, but also a place where craft remain aloft for days, weeks or months, capturing nearly everything that goes on below. The groundwork has been done: military applications have proven the effectiveness of most of these remote controlled and autonomous aircraft, and when the FAA finally gets around to determining the rules which will guide their development, the commercialization of them will begin,” according to the article.
Read full article —>


No. 2 — “Gary Johnson Brings Libertarianism To Nation”

Even though Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama got all the headlines, there were some other candidates for the highest office in the land, most notably Gary Johnson. The former New Mexico governor was never able to crack the mainstream media, so it is only rational that the articles we did on him were popular.

Besides, Johnson gave pretty lively speeches.

“How many of you have heard that a vote for Gary Johnson is a wasted vote?” Johnson queried a crowd in September. “Wasting your vote is voting for someone you don’t believe in. We change things in this country for voting for who you believe in. I want to ask you all to ‘waste’ your vote on me. You know what happens? I am the next president of the United States.”

Although it did not happen, Johnson can’t be accused of mailing it in.
Read full article —>


No. 1 — “One Man’s HIV/AIDS Story”

The most read Nation/World story of the year was a poignant, insightful peek inside the life of a man who has been living with HIV/AIDS for decades. No, it is not a tragic tale of someone who hit rock bottom, but the genuine, average, yet triumphal saga of what it is really like: buying high cost drugs to keep one alive and overcoming emotional hurdles.

Freelancer Vickie Goen brought us closer to Sean Reaney, who was diagnosed in the 1980s, and lost more than 40 friends to AIDS. He agreed to be interviewed and to publicize his illness in order to help people understand that HIV can be overcome — and that safe sex is imperative.

Job well done, Mr. Reaney.
Read full article —>
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